The Falconer's Voice

The makings of a trick shot

FRISBEE+FANATIC%3A+I+attempt+a+mid-air+trick+shot+that+snipes+a+basketball+off+a+ladder+and+into+a+mini+hoop.+This+shot+was+very+time-consuming+and+difficult%2C+yet+the+feeling+I+got+when+it+was+made+compares+to+no+other.
FRISBEE FANATIC: I attempt a mid-air trick shot that snipes a basketball off a ladder and into a mini hoop. This shot was very time-consuming and difficult, yet the feeling I got when it was made compares to no other.

FRISBEE FANATIC: I attempt a mid-air trick shot that snipes a basketball off a ladder and into a mini hoop. This shot was very time-consuming and difficult, yet the feeling I got when it was made compares to no other.

Kevin Hoppe

Kevin Hoppe

FRISBEE FANATIC: I attempt a mid-air trick shot that snipes a basketball off a ladder and into a mini hoop. This shot was very time-consuming and difficult, yet the feeling I got when it was made compares to no other.

Kevin Hoppe, Staff Writer

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My addiction to frisbee trick shots started in the spring of 2015 when the YouTube channel “Just Shoot It Trickshots” was born. Over the years, it has opened up new opportunities and has taught me life lessons.

When my trick shooting career started, figuring it out by myself was difficult. I learned all of the different throws from YouTube tutorials, and practicing was necessary for success. Originally starting with one frisbee, a cone, and my phone to make short, easy shots, I eventually grew to making 80 yard shots. Doing this gave me a better work ethic and forced me to work harder.

Freshman Mahdhav Rawal says, “One of the reasons I enjoy frisbee is that it’s less about athletic abilities and more about skill and precision. The more you practice the more you will improve.”

When setting up a trick shot, there are many things to consider. To start, think about the location. Certain locations, like parks, are better for long shots, while your house is better for short, creative shots. Think about what throw will be used to make the shot and if there will be any twist to it. Some throws, like the flick, are pretty basic, but behind the back, through the legs, and no-look flicks are trickier. Also, take into account certain throws go further and curve differently based on how they are released. Finally, decide on a target – cones, disc golf baskets, and hoops are all possibilities.

To make a trick shot, do not overthink it. There is no mathematical equation to follow; it is more so based on trial and error. If throws seem to end up in a similar location, then move the target. Just estimate where to throw and adjust until the trick shot is made.

There are many struggles that go along with trick shooting. When doing frisbee shots, thrown out arms, pulled muscles, and bloody blisters are expected. Sometimes it so bad that writing and using the throwing arm becomes difficult. Because of this, dedication is needed for trick shooting because giving up is not an option when things get hard.

Physical struggles are an issue, but not as much as the mental ones. Most of the time, it can take hours or even days to make a shot. At first, I tended to give up on myself and get angry, but now I have learned that patience is key. Not all shots are made the first try, so it is important to know these things take time.

On February 3, 2018, my dedication and patience was truly put to the test. My friend and I drove 90 minutes to an amazing trick shooting location, and we were not leaving without something amazing. It was freezing outside, yet I decided I was going to attempt an 80 yard shot into a disc golf basket.

After a couple tries, the trick shot was made. Feelings of excitement and relief rushed over me, and I was nearly out of breath from screaming in excitement. All of the time and energy put in paid off. All of the cracked discs, thrown out arms, and open blisters were suddenly worth it. It was one of the most exciting moments of my life, and it will never be forgotten.

Even though trick shooting takes time and can be difficult, many good things come from it as well. The feeling of satisfaction once a trick shot is made compares to nothing else. It shows all of the work and pain that the trick shot put you through as one final result.

After posting on YouTube for about a year, I created an Instagram account (@justshootittrickshots) as it allows trick shooters to post more often compared to YouTube, and there is a community of frisbee trick shooters on Instagram that provide support and competition to help others improve.

Freshman Pramit Patel, a fellow trick shooter, says, “I enjoy doing and posting trick shots on my Instagram @pe_trickshots because there is a whole group of trick shooters who help inspire me to do shots and to help me push my limits. Also, the feeling that you get when you nail a shot is unforgettable and gives you a burst of excitement.”

On Instagram, there are also many sponsorship opportunities from many different frisbee companies. Trick shooting can be expensive; I have over 45 discs, a hoop, and a disc golf basket, and sponsors can help with these costs. I am sponsored by Disc Store and Layout Ultimate, who have helped pay for discs, jerseys, and frisbee gloves.

For people wanting to start doing frisbee trick shots, start practicing as much as possible and try to learn more throws to increase the variety of shots. Do not be afraid to be creative with different shots and increase the difficulty of them. One of the reasons trick shots are fun is that there are very few limitations. I encourage new trick shooters to become friends with and to inspire others to help build the frisbee community.

Would you consider doing trick shots? Why or why not?

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About the Contributor
Kevin Hoppe, Staff Writer
Kevin Hoppe is a freshman at Monroe Township High School. He likes sleeping, watching “The Office” over and over again, doing frisbee trick shots, being the GOAT at “MarioKart,” making “Game of Thrones” references, ranting about Golden State Warrior bandwagoners, and watching dank meme compilations on YouTube. He took Journalism because he likes writing about...
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The makings of a trick shot